Saturday, June 24, 2017

Last days of my Artist Residency

It's hard to believe my four weeks at Weir Farm are almost at an end! Still lots to do before I leave. I have seven paintings in various stages of completion. (I never quite know if it's finished, until it's signed and framed.)

As you already know, this is the home of Julian Alden Weir. He is one of "The Ten" a renowned group of 10 American painters who frequently worked and exhibited together. Many attended the École des Beaux-Arts in France, as Weir did, studying with Jean-Léon Gérôme and becoming friends with the likes of Jules Bastien-Lepage and John Singer Sargent. Not bad company!


Weir's rural home became a gathering place for artists to leave the city and paint en plein air. The artistic tradition continues through the efforts of the Weir Farm Art Center which coordinates the residency, choosing individual artists to hunker down in the cottage and studio. Their gift is uninterrupted time for artists working in a variety of genre or media.

(Well, it hasn't always been solitary for me as a few artists and friends have come by to see what's going on. And some got creative as well. I see more plein air outings in our future.)

Laura and Leslie confer and critique

I think I have had a pretty conscientious studio habit, but I hoped that being here with nothing but my own initiative and inspiration would help me learn a little more about my creative process - including recognizing obstacles. I'm still figuring it all out, but it has been a valuable, dedicated time, focused on my art process.

It's so peaceful here and one of the new habits that was easy to fall into is taking a walk each day. After wandering the natural beauty of the woods and walkways I step into the studio feeling more connected to my work. Being refreshed and relaxed makes creative effort flow more naturally. Nice!

Here is a foggy morning view from one of my walks. This is the Burlingham house, home of Cora Weir Burlingham. It's now the visitors center but still maintains charming, historic architectural details. What a way to start the day.

walk in the fog

All my completed - and nearly-completed - Weir Farm paintings will be on view this Monday during an end-of-residency Artist Talk at the Wilton Library. If you'd like to take a look, and a listen, come by at 6 pm. It will be a casual talk, until about 6:45 or 7. Or, if you have questions about the residency please comment below and I'll answer whatever I can. Anyone interested in applying should check out the website early. Although applications aren't due until October, letters of recommendation are required and those can take time to gather.

Meanwhile... here is the latest unfinished painting - the foyer of the Weir home. This one is all about patterns: wallpaper, carpets, bookcase. Why do I do this?! I always start out loving patterns... and then they make me crazy for awhile. Eventually it will be finished. Maybe by Monday's presentation. Hmmm, probably not.

Weir Farm, historic home
work in progress of interior of Weir home

Moving beyond this month's exercise in interiors, we will be spending time among Dutch artists and architecture. I predict a return to classic still life coming soon!

Thanks for coming along on m art journey! And if you are in the area, journey to Weir Farm this summer for your own enriching visit.



Saturday, June 17, 2017

About using photos... or not

My time at Weir Farm is already half over. Hard to believe. So far I have completed five interior and still life paintings and half a plein air painting. I've also been invited on some interesting tours by rangers and volunteers that add to my appreciation of the history of this site. One tour centered on love letters between Julian and Anna as a way to get to know them better. Very sweet.

Being here really does ignite the creative spirit, even though I am not able to set up my easel and paint within the historic home or studio. Working from photos is not typical for me but since I can still re-visit the locations, I don't mind. To be honest, there is "controversy" among artists about painting from photos. People tend to fall into one of two groups:
  1. those who use photos routinely and believe painting from photos is fine
  2. those for whom painting from photos is totally taboo... and maybe even an insult to the creative process
Some of us are a bit less dogmatic. Honestly, everyone has different creative goals and can forge their own path. For me, the goal is to work from life whenever possible and use photos only as a "Plan B". Like extending the life of a perishable still life when grapes are becoming raisins. Or when a National Historic Site invites you to paint on campus...but not IN the historic rooms. I had to adjust my process here. First I explored with a camera and took as many photos as I thought I might need. But I also had access to return to locations for more photos, clarification or inspiration. The Park Rangers and staff have been very accommodating.

This is my set up in the studio, with photos displayed on a large monitor -
easel, monitor, painting set-up

One advantage to using photos is that it's easier to create a two dimensional painting from a two dimensional image. Perspective and foreshortening are easier to see, as spacial relationships are flattened in 2D. And this, I believe, is one objection by artists in group #2 above. It's easier: less blood, sweat and tears.

But it's also true that paintings done from photos can look flat. Cameras can only see a small percentage of colors compared to what our eyes can see, so much of the richness is lost. I think if you've been painting from life, it's easier to realize what's missing when you have to work from photos. The best way to have that understanding is to spend time drawing and painting from life.

This pantry is pretty simple looking but it had perspective challenges. It was hard to figure out from photos because I couldn't back up far enough to see where the angles converged, but going back to the space I was able to compare which walls were truly parallel or perpendicular and make sense of it.
light in doorway, china chelves, cups and saucers, still life, oil painting
The Butler's Pantry at Weir Farm ©2017 Dorothy Lorenze
Some artists object to the use of photos on the grounds that it's not traditional, the old masters didn't rely on cameras. But I personally question that. Artists are generally creative problem solvers and I can certainly imagine Leonardo da Vinci being fascinated by a camera. In fact, given time, he probably would have invented it!

In 2001 David Hockney wrote Secret Knowledge a book about how he believed early painters used optics and lenses with the camera obscura to trace images onto canvas. You can see the BBC episodes about it here and here. It's interesting but I think the more fascinating study of master artists relying on mechanical assistance is found in the film Tim's Vermeer, available on youTube. It's an amazing demonstration of a non-artist recreating a painting using mechanical visual aids. What I think is especially worthwhile is his observation of how light is diffused over distance. It's an important concept for representational artists because it helps create depth, enhancing realism.

Photography is a helpful tool but my feeling is that it shouldn't replace drawing from life. Drawing is about training your eye to see and spending time with the subject to get to know it better. That can help in so many ways beyond rendering form well. The time spent drawing and observing helps you decide what to enhance and what to exclude, decisions that can make a better painting.

Here are some of my latest Weir Farm paintings. I took photos of this room from every angle. And although, in the end I chose this image, I used the others to get more information about where the light was coming from, and especially how light affected patterns on the wallpaper and carpet. This one is not finished yet, still need to fine tune areas, but it was a good example of how using multiple photos gave me more information.
orientla carpet, fireplace, chinese ginger jar
Julian's Parlor at Weir Farm, ©2017 Dorothy Lorenze
After all the time-consuming tediousness of the first few interiors, I needed to return to my comfort zone and do a little still life. This is a scene from Weir's studio so it was also painted from a photo. I'm sure that my time painting still life from life helped give this little painting some of its richness.

bottles, palette, colors, paints
Watercolor Pigments at Weir Farm ©2017 Dorothy Lorenze
Tomorrow I get to choose another scene to be inspired by at Weir Farm. And later this week I hope to join the rangers in their workshop about discussing artwork with the public on tours. That should be really interesting!

Thanks for sticking around through this long post. It's been a busy and very interesting journey these past few weeks!

Saturday, June 10, 2017

A day in my life at Weir Farm

Getting settled at Weir Farm couldn't have been easier. The staff were welcoming and helpful and the weather cooperated so I was able to wander the grounds and take it all in.

My artistic goal, while here for the month, is primarily to paint interior scenes of the many historic spaces. But painting in situ is not allowed since this is a National Historic Park ...with government rules, etc. Totally understandable. So I'm working from photos (more on that in a future post) and since I'm a semi-neurotic over-achiever, I visited in advance of my stay to take pictures for prepping and planning.

Knowing that on the last Monday of each resident's stay, they give a talk at the Wilton Library presenting their work, I definitely wanted to have some finished paintings to show! So I actually started the painting of Mahonri Young's sculpture studio (Weir's brother-in-law) at home. It felt good to have one painting completed within a few days of arrival. People do stop by to chat and if all I had to show were the early/ugly stages it would not be encourging! That's just how it is with early stages: gangly adolescents.

interior paintings, studio space, studio interior
Mahonri's Sculpture Studio, Weir Farm ©2017 Dorothy Lorenze

The first full week of painting included some distractions. Doctor follow-ups that couldn't be rescheduled as well as interviews with two local papers. Stephanie Kim of the Wilton Villager has published her very kind comments already and you can read her article here. Meanwhile, it rained a lot and I worked in the studio for hours most days.

I'm focusimg on new habits this month and another goal is to spend time out doors walking, hiking... being. It's easy to be seduced by nature here. There are 60 acres of land with miles of hiking trails that also connect with a larger network of CT trails. I haven't ventured beyond the Weir acres but I'm proud to say, I have walked every day, barring downpours. (plus taken advantage of the open, zen-like upper floor of the cottage to exercise on rainy days.) And here's the thing I've discovered - when I get into the studio after spending 45 minutes out in the fields and woods, I feel  more connected to my work. Isn't that amazing?!!

hiking trails

In addition to the natural beauty, there are gorgeous gardens, naturalized and formal, that just happen to be blooming with peonies and iris. The thing I haven't done yet that is on my must-do list is to sketch on the grounds. But, I know I'll get to it.

My second painting is a simple scene of the butler's pantry. Well, not so simple because the perspective was difficult with so many angles of walls and cabinets. And then there was the matter of putting dishes on the shelves. But that's the kind of challenge I enjoy. It was the light in this scene that first captured my attention.

pantry, china shelves
Butler's Pantry ©2017 Dorothy Lorenze

Today I painted from 7:30 am to 8:30 pm with a nice long walk midday. A perfect and productive day. As I returned to the studio after dinner a group of painters were arriving for an evening painting class with Dmitri Wright, so when I was done I went out looking and found them dotting the landscape like fireflies. It was dusk and they were totally into it! I would never have thought of painting outdoors at that hour, but it seemed truly wonderful and I will have to try it. Another inspiration from Weir Farm!


It was nice to chat with fellow artists (this is a rather solitary experience) and on the way back "home" I passed the windows of the visitor center aglow in the twilight. This house was formerly the home of a Weir daughter and you can just imagine the family discussing plans for the next day... 100 years ago.

Good night from Weir Farm!

 Thanks for joining me on my artistic journey.


Thursday, June 1, 2017

Weir Farm Artist in Residence, week 1

Dear Friends,

Please bear with me this month as I expect to write a bit more often because I have the unique honor of being Artist in Residence at Weir Farm in CT in June. That means I am spending the entire month living in a rustic cottage adjacent to a beautiful studio that is mine-all-mine for 24 hours a day, 7 days a week through the month of June!


There are all sorts of residencies - from commune-like gatherings of artists of varied visual media to semi-private spaces where the artists range from writers to sculptors to musicians. In these settings, often group meals and common space are provided for socializing and relaxing.

Weir Farm, in contrast, offers a solitary experience in a simple cottage with a summer-camp vibe that is steps away from a large and well lit studio. And the back wall of the studio is all windows, opening onto a deck that overlooks a woodland stream. Ahhh! The cottage is the former caretakers house, built in the 1830s. The studio was built in 2010 specifically for Weir's artists in residence and it's design reflects the original barn that had stood on the site. Very cool!

So, how did I get here? Well, Weir Farm is the only National Park Historic Site dedicated to American painting. After having painted at the studio of George Lawrence Nelson in Kent CT, the idea of creating artwork at the home of Julian Alden Weir, renowned American Impressionist, was too good to pass up so I applied.
"The Art Center's mission is to promote public awareness of the Farm's history and artistic tradition, and through its programs, facilitate contemporary artistic work on the site, fulfill educational goals, and preserve the Farm's unique environment."
http://www.weirfarmartcenter.org/artistinresidence/guidelines.html
Artist Residency Studio at Weir Farm
The residency program is overseen by the Weir Farm Art Center which accepts applications in October. Prospective artists must provide images typical of their artwork and a work plan for their time at Weir, as well as several letters of recommendation. Between 10 and 12 artists are chosen each year to stay up to 4 weeks. It's quite an opportunity for uninterrupted, focused art-making.

My work at Weir will center on painting interiors of the house and studios. I'm looking at this time as an opportunity to think through the challenges of creating mood and atmosphere through light in interior scenes. Not sure if I can accomplish that, but having uninterrupted time to think, examine, plan, compose and execute should bring me closer to that goal.

Today is the first day. Primarily, I've been settling in and finding my way around. I've already photographed some of the spaces that I plan to paint and I'm wrapping my head around what I hope to accomplish over all.


It's not just about the paint, but also about developing habits, to become more centered in the work and to simply be more productive with my creative time and energy. We shall see!

Thanks for coming along for this ride. I will keep you posted!






Saturday, May 13, 2017

Happy Mothering Day


My exploration into the world of art probably began at about the age of 10 with a series of portfolio-like books called Art Treasures of the World by Abrams Art Books. There were 15 volumes of oversized, softcover books with individual color plates that were tipped in rather than printed on the page. Since the plates were on coated paper, the colors and reproduction quality were excellent. At 10 I may not have noticed those details, but as someone who loved to draw and "color" I remember being in awe of the beautiful, realistic images. I was amazed such detailed images could be created by hand, with paint! It sure didn't work with crayons.

These books may have been Reader's Digest selections, but I suspect a door-to-door salesman made the introduction. In those days my mom didn't drive, so door-to-door salesmen were lucky to find her: an eager customer. And I was even luckier.

Each volume featured the work of a single artist. The set focused mainly on Impressionists, but also included El Greco (whose dark elongated figures scared me) and Modigliani and Picasso (who my wise, 10 year-old self thought needed a few more drawing lessons). Favorites were Van Gogh, Degas and Toulouse Lautrec (precursor to my future graphic design interest, perhaps). I poured over these books and in later years remember surprising a Junior High art teacher by recognizing the work of Utrillo.
impressionist artist resource

I'm really not sure how much time my mother spent perusing art books. Whatever leisure time she had was after we seven kids were in bed (more about that here). But she introduced me to fine art, in my own home, and somehow that made it feel possibly possible. The books are gone and Mom's memory is feeble and it's too late to ask how important these volumes may have been to her. I can only give her credit for this initial inculcation which has stayed with me. Recently I found copies of two of the volumes in an antique store. I hold them as reminders of Mom's first gentle push toward my artistic journey.

On this Mother's Day thoughts of nurturing turn toward artists. Making artwork is risky. It's very personal and we generally aspire to something greater than we feel capable of achieving. Not to mention the fact that it's usually/eventually done in a somewhat public manner. We make personal images and say, "Look!" Scary stuff.

So it's heartwarming when artists mother one another and I'm pleased to say it happens often. Sure, there are those who anxiously guard their inside info and "tricks of the trade," but more often I'm finding artists who recognize that we are all swimming in the same water and we have the ability to help one another stay afloat with encouragement and shared experiences. We can mother each other without loosing a piece of ourselves. In fact, if you love art it's an honor to help another artist make this world a more beautiful and meaningful place. We all win.

Happy Mother's Day to all you nurturing souls!

stuffed penguin toy, penguin, stuffed puppy, dog, yellow lab, mutsy
Pup & Penguin - who nurtured Tessa & Hamo... & Clara

Thank you for joining me on my art journey.

Sunday, May 7, 2017

Workshops and other adventures




You know what they say: April workshops bring May flowers. Something like that.

Carlo's "theater of operations"
This April I attended a floral painting workshop with Carlo Russo. The weather was pretty cold and miserable for April in Virginia, but the attendees were warm and friendly and the flowers were gorgeous. The class was held in Deb Keirce's home which she transforms into a workshop studio space for 8 - 10 artists. Deb hosts well-known, master artists' workshops throughout the year. I was drawn to Carlo Russo's class because his paintings are so beautiful.

For Carlo's demo he painted ranunculus which are pretty complex with their tightly layered petals. His process is to start with a loose wash to establish the composition.

painting demo by Carlo Russo
For four days we enjoyed a morning demo, hours of painting and constant discussion about all aspects of art.
 
Below is my set up and progress shots from the workshop. Carlo's wash was tidier, but mine still provided the "road map" needed to establish my composition. I had brought a silver creamer knowing I would paint blooms before they wilted and could finish the container at home, which I did.
 floral painting, work in progress, oil study

Here's the final Rosy Nosegay -
Rosy Nosegay ©2017 Dorothy Lorenze
 
Flowers are sweet and tender - and tough to paint! The petals are translucent and delicate and, of course, they wilt. To gain a more practiced eye navigating these overlapping forms, I've been doing floral paintings since the workshop. These and a few others will be available at Who's Cooking in Croton Falls this month. To celebrate Spring ...if it ever gets here.


In other Spring news, I'm pleased to say that my painting Téte à Téte à Tootsies was awarded fourth place in American Women Artists 2017 Online juried exhibit.
oil painting, antique shoes, hat pins
©2017 Dorothy Lorenze

It was especially gratifying because the body of work for this show is so impressive! I am truly honored to be among such a fine group of artists. Also so thankful for the generous prize package from Gamblin Oils, Blick Art Supplies, Jack Richardson and AWA - Christmas in April! Here is a link to the award winners.

Trying new things

I truly believe that personal growth requires trying new things and getting outside of your comfort zone (except for sky diving, mountain climbing, roller coasters... high stuff: gotta draw the line). Workshops can feel like a daunting venture if the subject or technique is unfamiliar. It's so worth it. Spending several days with a group of folks focused only on art is an enriching immersion experience. And such a gift to oneself. Just to make sure "I'm worth it" I keep working at it when I get home. Floral paintings - I'm starting to feel more comfortable with them.

Locally, Todd Casey has a workshop coming up in Somers, May 20 & 21. Todd is a master at painting and teaching. He always has so much information to share. If you are interested, details are  here. Check in with him soon because space is limited.
This is an example of Todd's classical process.
©2017 Todd M. Casey

For my next new art adventure... I will be spending the month of June as Artist in Residence at Weir Farm in Wilton, CT.

Just me and my paint brushes. 

My plan is to work on interior scenes from Weir Farm. This National Park and historic site was the home of American Impressionist Julian Alden Weir and it's the only National Park dedicated to American painting. Imagine that! I'm used to painting nearly every day, but this will be truly focused time. Kind of a solitary, private workshop. I promise you'll be hearing more about it come June.

Meanwhile, enjoy the weather and go do something that enriches your soul ...or tickles your fancy.

Thanks for joining me on my art journey.

Tuesday, March 28, 2017

News and New Work

The "quiet" winter months are nearly behind us, but I'm pleased to say it's been fairly active art-wise thanks to shows at Salmagundi Club, auctions and online sales. Several paintings have found new homes including the original study for Who Knows Where the Time Goes, as well as the larger commissioned painting, and Munchkin Spoonful.
vintage, antique, hour glass, baby shoe
study ©2016 Dorothy Lorenze
white pumpkin, silver spoon
Munchkin Spoonful ©2015 Dorothy Lorenze

Two earlier paintings sold at a silent auction benefiting the Taghkanic Chorale. It's always exciting to see the bids go up, but kind of worrying until it starts! These paintings were from a series focused on figuring out how-the-heck to paint glass!

canning jar, blue glass, reflections, transluscency

Two new paintings are currently in the member show at Kent Art Association. To see that show, take a ride up Route 7 to lovely Kent CT now through April 16th. It's a quaint town with cafés and antique stores - and art! The paintings on exhibit at Kent Art Gallery are: East Meets West and Table & Stairs.
blue china teapot, copper kettle, vintage metal, antigue china
East Meets West ©2017 Dorothy Lorenze
maple tabletop, painted wood stairway, colonial house
Table & Stairs ©2017 Dorothy Lorenze
Next up is the elegant Appetite for Art cocktail reception this weekend. It benefits the Ruth Keeler Memorial Library in North Salem and is such a nice event with artwork of all genres. There were many sales last year. My pieces are the interior and still life, below. Interestingly, I submitted four paintings and the two works chosen were both painted in the same Victorian home in San Francisco. Both presented interesting challenges - the wallpaper and carpet in the interior and another exploration of light and reflection in glass. Wish me luck.
antique carpet, floral wallpaper, interior scene, genre painting
Sitting Pretty ©2015 Dorothy Lorenze
transluscency, reflection, conch shell
Green Glass Glows ©2015 Dorothy Lorenze
The most exciting news is an upcoming floral workshop with Carlo Russo in Virginia in early April. Flowers are tough! Carlo is a masterful painter and I look forward to learning how to approach this complex subject. I've painted very few flowers because the structure of most blooms is hard to discern and simplify so this should be interesting. Hopefully I'll be able to show some flower paintings very soon. Keep an eye out. After all, spring is supposedly here!

Thanks for reading!

Monday, February 6, 2017

Fooling the Eye with Paint


I've been fascinated by trompe l'oeil paintings forever. The fire was fueled during a workshop at the John F. Peto Studio Museum and I finally decided to try my hand at a composition typical of this genre. "Trompe l'oeil" literally means "fool the eye" and the idea is to create a three dimensional effect with objects that are arranged in a shallow depth of field. Overlapping elements and careful attention to shadows help create the illusion. It can also be a play on reality vs illusion. But not in my composition. Reality is hard enough!

Old Souvenirs ©1881 John F. Peto
Here's an example of Peto's work, Old Souvenirs, 1881, which hangs at the Met Museum.

A classic trope of trompe is the letter rack. These paintings feature an early version of a bulletin board where ribbons or leather straps secure items. Often there was political commentary or some other personal agenda hidden within the objects. The example below is by Edward Collier and was painted in 1696! I love fragile edges of old, browning paper, so this is right up my alley.
Trompe L'Oeil Letter Rack ©1696 Edward Collier
To make the "rack" I used the top of a wooden wine box, found leather strips found on Etsy and secured them with tiny copper nails from our local, old-school hardware store.

creating a letter rack
Below left is the letter rack set up with a variety of vintage papers, assorted writing materials and office supplies. At right is the first pass of color over most of the canvas.

Set up and early work in progress
I've been asked how long it takes to do a painting so I'm trying to pay attention to my studio time. The initial set up (deciding on elements and composition), original drawing, transfer to canvas and beginning to lay down color took the better part of one day.

The following day the first pass of color was completed and some details of objects were added.

Then I left town for a few days. But that's OK because I got hugs from this sweet chickadee. Heavenly.

So...
back home and back in the studio, I worked for three days, probably 4-6 hours a day and I thought it was done.

Sometimes painting is like baking bread. You just have to let it "rest".

A few days later, I realized it wasn't quite finished. The diagonal shadow in the lower left wasn't clear. Some of the small cast shadows needed to be refined to help describe objects. Finally, I signed a scrap of paper, tacked it lower left, and painted the signature. It added to the composition - and was just plain fun to do!

This 12 x 16" painting took about 6 days to complete, which seems pretty quick for such detail (the folded pink and yellow papers below center are receipts - they actually have rule lines and invoice numbers!)

trompe l'oeil painting, still life, illustion
Noteworthy ©2017 Dorothy Lorenze, 12 x 16" oil on linen
The key is starting with a thorough drawing. And X-ray vision might have helped. But lacking that, it was important to check that all the edges of the papers were aligned, creating rectangles rather than trapezoids, overlapping corners that were hidden because the angles are accurate. So the challenge is to use comparative measuring to create realistic details while keeping a sense of artistry and poetry overall.

I don't know if I totally achieved the realism/poetry balance on this one but I really enjoyed trying and plan to do more. Possibly with specific themes ...or hidden meanings?! We shall see. Stay tuned, and let me know what you think.

Thanks for joining me on my art journey.

Thursday, January 19, 2017

When life gives you (Cadmium) Lemon...

...or Alizarin Crimson or Ultramarine Blue where it shouldn't be, it can scare the crap out of you! But, splat happens.

After a week of painting these beautiful little baby shoes, I was nearly finished. Just a few fine details to add. So, I took it off the easel to turn it to a better angle for adding shadows under those tiny buttons.

progress shot, original oil painting, still lifeLooks pretty much done, right? 

Then I somehow bobbled it and dropped the painting face down on my wet palette. Crap.

There is no photo of that mess, because I was too panicked about fixing it. So, just to provide a visual of my agony - below, for your commiseration and amusement, is a Photoshop-created "map" of the piles and plops. Each was swirled to a lovely little peak of paint, like cupcakes dipped in icing.

The worst was ta big red pile that landed on the creamy leather spat, obliterating subtle shading, fine seams and contrasting stitching. Alizarin Crimson, no less, which is notorious for staining.
palette mess
I used a palette knife to lift the plopped paint, then blotted it with paper towel and tried not to panic... too much.

Then I remembered advice I got years ago, after losing files for 100+ pages of a journal I was designing. I desperately called my graphic-designer-daughter for help recovering weeks of lost work. Sadly, that wasn't possible, but she said, "Don't worry, it won't be that hard to recreate because you've already made all the decisions." I was skeptical, but she was right.

Surprisingly, the same thing applies to re-painting. So many issues had already been worked out - the structure was there and the hierarchy of values. It really wasn't too awfully hard to repair. Although, I'd rather not repeat the experience!

Here's the finished painting. There were many interesting challenges: the contrast of soft worn leather with shiny hard toes, golden highlights on the hatpin holder and the oh-so-subtle tapestry pattern. And you would never know that deep red paint landed, uninvited, smack dab in the center! It was all rather nerve-wracking, but a helpful to realize that making decisions about proportion, value, edges, transitions and saturation is the hard part. And it's helpful, too, that oil painting "do-overs" are not totally impossible! (Sorry water colorists.)
tete a tete, vintage shoes, antique hat pins
Tête à Tête à Tootsies ©2017 Dorothy Lorenze, 6x8"
In other news... recent painting sales include these: The Book of Mango, Muscoot Milk House, Morning Light at Seven Hearths and Who Knows Where the Time Goes. Sincere thanks to my wonderful collectors!

realistic still life, rustic interior
The Book of Mango & Muscoot Milk House ©2016 Lorenze
realistic still life, rustic interior
Who Knows Where the Time Goes (2017), Morning Light (2015)

Also "East Meets West" recently won the 1st Vice President's Award at Salmagundi Club of NY. What a thrill to be there with so many wonderful artists! This painting is available on my website.

blue china teapot, copper tea kettle
East Meets West ©2016 Dorothy Lorenze, 12 x 16"

Looking forward to an exciting, creative year. I hope you are too. If you're interested, take a look at my latest Craftsy online post here. It offers ideas and steps to get more art-making time in your life.

Thanks for joining me on my art journey.